Commemorating the victims

Thanks to the Centre’s work over many years, the commemoration of the Sinti and Roma murdered under the Nazis is now firmly established in Germany’s culture of remembrance. And thanks to civic initiatives, well over a hundred monuments commemorating Sinti and Roma victims now stand in various towns and cities as well as at various memorial sites. The forms of remembrance range from traditional memorials to the naming of streets after individual victims.

The monument to the murdered Sinti and Roma at the Buchenwald Memorial Documentation Centre Archives, photographer: Jürgen M. Pietsch, Spröda
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The monument near Magdeburg Cathedral for Magdeburg’s persecuted and murdered Sinti and Roma Documentation Centre Archives, photographer: Jürgen M. Pietsch, Spröda
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In August 2004 a street in the old city centre of Hanover was named after the boxer Johann Trollmann, who was murdered by the Nazis. Documentation Centre Archives, photographer: Franz Fender
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01 | Franz Rosenbach at the Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial, speaking about his experiences as a prisoner at the former extermination camp (August 2008). Documentation Centre Archives, photographer: Rogier Fokke
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02 | Documentation Centre Archives, photographer: Rogier Fokke
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01 | On 15 April 2015, the EU Parliament declared 2 August to be the European Day of Holocaust Remembrance for the Roma and Sinti. The date is certainly symbolic: it was on 2 August 1944 that the last men, women and children held prisoner at the ‘gypsy camp’ in Auschwitz-Birkenau were gassed. Documentation Centre […]
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02 |  Documentation Centre Archives, photographer: Rogier Fokke
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